Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Waist-to-weight ratio vs. body max index


The optimal waist / weight ratio (WWR) theory () is one of the most compatible with evidence regarding the lowest mortality body mass index (BMI).

But why do we need the WWR when we already have the BMI? This was a question that a reader asked me in connection with a post on the John Stone transformation ().

The montage below shows photos of the John Stone transformation with the respective WWR and BMI measures.



Well, which one is the most useful measure, WWR or BMI?

7 comments:

Richard Jacobson said...

Which ever measure best measures the presence of visceral fat is the one to use. And that would be WWR.

My research is this area is leading me to belive that visceral fat is the main driver of diseases of civilization.

Ned Kock said...

Hi Richard. Your research is in line with most of the published research on the topic. Interestingly though, visceral fat mass is very easy to mobilize.

Richard Jacobson said...

Yes VF is easily mobilized if you do have a well functioning metabolic system.

However, if you are metabolically damaged or elderly, visceral fat is difficult to mobilize. Thus visceral fat to most overweight Americans is a major problem.

Nick said...

Ned, I'm curious. Aside from the observation that he looks better in photo two vs. photo one, do you truly think he is healthier in photos three or four based on his body shape?

Ned Kock said...

Hi Nick. I think that the WWRs are a good reflection of his health status.

Ned Kock said...

When I say that visceral fat is “easy” to mobilize, I mean relatively easy. It still requires intense exercise, of the type that raises GH levels.

David Isaak said...

According to the sequence of pictures, the key health indicator appears to be tanning--at least in Caucasians.